Title

Neutralization of Interleukin-5 in Experimental Hookworm Infection Leads to Higher Parasitemia

Presenter Information

Stephanie Moesch

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 202

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Hookworm infection is associated with anemia and malnutrition in developing countries and affects nearly 800 million people worldwide. Human and animal studies suggest that infection with these intestinal parasites is associated with suppression of the host immune response including effect on host cytokine production. Interleukin-5 (IL-5), a cytokine involved in the maturation/differentiation of eosinophils has been shown to play a role in resistance to hookworm and other worm infections. In order to further characterize the role of IL-5 in hookworm infection, we conducted experiments where the antibody TRFK-5 was used to neutralize IL-5 production in hamsters. The animals were infected with 75 third stage larvae of Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm. A group of hamsters received the antibody TRFK-5 three days before infection and at day 7 and 14 post infection (PI), and another group got the control antibody following the same schedule. Infected hamsters receiving TRFK-5 showed higher worm burden and weight loss than those injected with the control antibody. Egg count was assessed and was higher in the TRFK-5 group at 21 days PI (5411 ± 174 versus 3400 ± 200 in control antibody group, p = 0.001). The A. ceylanicum-specific antibody levels were assessed at day 21 PI and hamsters in the TRFK-5 group had lower optical density reflecting a lower amount of antibodies (0.329 ± .126 versus 0.56 ± .05 in control antibody group, p=0.0001). Together, these data highlight the important role of IL-5 in the host immune defense against hookworm.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Blaise Dondji

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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Neutralization of Interleukin-5 in Experimental Hookworm Infection Leads to Higher Parasitemia

SURC 202

Hookworm infection is associated with anemia and malnutrition in developing countries and affects nearly 800 million people worldwide. Human and animal studies suggest that infection with these intestinal parasites is associated with suppression of the host immune response including effect on host cytokine production. Interleukin-5 (IL-5), a cytokine involved in the maturation/differentiation of eosinophils has been shown to play a role in resistance to hookworm and other worm infections. In order to further characterize the role of IL-5 in hookworm infection, we conducted experiments where the antibody TRFK-5 was used to neutralize IL-5 production in hamsters. The animals were infected with 75 third stage larvae of Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm. A group of hamsters received the antibody TRFK-5 three days before infection and at day 7 and 14 post infection (PI), and another group got the control antibody following the same schedule. Infected hamsters receiving TRFK-5 showed higher worm burden and weight loss than those injected with the control antibody. Egg count was assessed and was higher in the TRFK-5 group at 21 days PI (5411 ± 174 versus 3400 ± 200 in control antibody group, p = 0.001). The A. ceylanicum-specific antibody levels were assessed at day 21 PI and hamsters in the TRFK-5 group had lower optical density reflecting a lower amount of antibodies (0.329 ± .126 versus 0.56 ± .05 in control antibody group, p=0.0001). Together, these data highlight the important role of IL-5 in the host immune defense against hookworm.