Title

Correlation of Environmental Temperature and Ice Content During Freezing in Pseudacris regilla

Presenter Information

Jeff Yeabsley

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

The correlation of environmental temperature and ice content during freezing was studied in the pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), a species that demonstrates freeze-tolerance, and overwinters on the forest floor under organic detritus. While freeze-tolerance has been studied and observed, but no data regarding the ice content of the frogs as they freeze has been published. This data is important, as it will supplement others research in the study of cryoprotectants, which in the future may allow for preservation of organs longer than 24 hrs. Frogs were cooled in a jacketed beaker from room temperature to below their freezing point, and then thawed. Temperature inside the vessel, and subcutaneous electrical resistance of the frog were measured. The electrical resistance was used to determine extracellular ice content.

Poster Number

20

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jason Irwin

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 17th, 11:15 AM May 17th, 1:45 PM

Correlation of Environmental Temperature and Ice Content During Freezing in Pseudacris regilla

SURC Ballroom A

The correlation of environmental temperature and ice content during freezing was studied in the pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), a species that demonstrates freeze-tolerance, and overwinters on the forest floor under organic detritus. While freeze-tolerance has been studied and observed, but no data regarding the ice content of the frogs as they freeze has been published. This data is important, as it will supplement others research in the study of cryoprotectants, which in the future may allow for preservation of organs longer than 24 hrs. Frogs were cooled in a jacketed beaker from room temperature to below their freezing point, and then thawed. Temperature inside the vessel, and subcutaneous electrical resistance of the frog were measured. The electrical resistance was used to determine extracellular ice content.