Title

The Effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and Different E. coli Diets on C. elegans Mitochondrial Metabolism

Presenter Information

Hayden Messerman

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom C/D

Start Date

16-5-2013

End Date

16-5-2013

Abstract

We have investigated the effects of different bacterial diets on C. elegans as a model for metabolic studies in obesity and diabetes research. Our goal was to understand C. elegans’ base line metabolism by measuring ATP content under different dietary conditions. This study examined three strains of E. coli that can be used as food for C. elegans. The E. coli strains OP50 and HB101 are used as regular diets and HT115, which is a derivative of HB101. It has previously been shown that OP50 has higher fatty acid composition and HB101 has higher carbohydrate composition. The ATP content in OP50 fed worms was significantly lower than the HB101 and HT115 fed worms in both wild-type and nnt-1 strains of C. elegans. The nnt-1 strain is deficient in a mitochondrial protein, nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT-1), associated with type-2 diabetes. In addition to these baseline studies, 2-deoxy-D-glucose was used as an inhibitor of glycolysis as a method for forcing fat metabolism in C. elegans. This dietary model could then be used to investigate the effects of increased fat metabolism on mitochondrial function in C. elegans. The baseline results were reversed in the 2-deoxy-D-glucose experiments suggesting that the worms were relying on fat metabolism. Future studies are planned to measure mitochondrial membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and respiration to further understand the effects of increased fat metabolism on the mitochondria.

Poster Number

37

Faculty Mentor(s)

Carin Thomas, Lucinda Carnell

Additional Mentoring Department

Chemistry

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 16th, 8:20 AM May 16th, 10:50 AM

The Effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and Different E. coli Diets on C. elegans Mitochondrial Metabolism

SURC Ballroom C/D

We have investigated the effects of different bacterial diets on C. elegans as a model for metabolic studies in obesity and diabetes research. Our goal was to understand C. elegans’ base line metabolism by measuring ATP content under different dietary conditions. This study examined three strains of E. coli that can be used as food for C. elegans. The E. coli strains OP50 and HB101 are used as regular diets and HT115, which is a derivative of HB101. It has previously been shown that OP50 has higher fatty acid composition and HB101 has higher carbohydrate composition. The ATP content in OP50 fed worms was significantly lower than the HB101 and HT115 fed worms in both wild-type and nnt-1 strains of C. elegans. The nnt-1 strain is deficient in a mitochondrial protein, nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT-1), associated with type-2 diabetes. In addition to these baseline studies, 2-deoxy-D-glucose was used as an inhibitor of glycolysis as a method for forcing fat metabolism in C. elegans. This dietary model could then be used to investigate the effects of increased fat metabolism on mitochondrial function in C. elegans. The baseline results were reversed in the 2-deoxy-D-glucose experiments suggesting that the worms were relying on fat metabolism. Future studies are planned to measure mitochondrial membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and respiration to further understand the effects of increased fat metabolism on the mitochondria.