Title

Peace, Love, Unity, and Respect: The Moral Economy of Rave Culture

Presenter Information

Brittany Anderson

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC 271

Start Date

21-5-2015

End Date

21-5-2015

Keywords

Economy, Gifting, Consumption

Abstract

Each year tens of thousands of individuals travel great distances to the largest rave event in the Pacific Northwest, located at an outdoor arena in Washington State. Social expectations at rave events such as this are forged by the rave values of peace, love, unity, and respect, referred to by ravers as PLUR. Ravers promote PLUR through the sharing of drugs, alcohol, kandi bracelets, and costumes. This presentation analyzes fieldwork from this rave in order to contemplate apparent contradictions within rave culture that are fostered when the moral economy of PLUR meets conspicuous consumption. Ravers strive for an economy outside market forces while at the same time reinforcing market economy through ticket sales, camping supplies, costumes, and original payments made for bartering material. How do participants at raves practice solidarity yet remain individual, and how are these two positions reflected in moral obligations and economy?

Faculty Mentor(s)

Hope Amason

Department/Program

Anthropology & Museum Studies

Additional Mentoring Department

Anthropology & Museum Studies

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May 21st, 11:40 AM May 21st, 1:00 PM

Peace, Love, Unity, and Respect: The Moral Economy of Rave Culture

SURC 271

Each year tens of thousands of individuals travel great distances to the largest rave event in the Pacific Northwest, located at an outdoor arena in Washington State. Social expectations at rave events such as this are forged by the rave values of peace, love, unity, and respect, referred to by ravers as PLUR. Ravers promote PLUR through the sharing of drugs, alcohol, kandi bracelets, and costumes. This presentation analyzes fieldwork from this rave in order to contemplate apparent contradictions within rave culture that are fostered when the moral economy of PLUR meets conspicuous consumption. Ravers strive for an economy outside market forces while at the same time reinforcing market economy through ticket sales, camping supplies, costumes, and original payments made for bartering material. How do participants at raves practice solidarity yet remain individual, and how are these two positions reflected in moral obligations and economy?