Title

Spatial and Temporal Relationships of the American pika (Ochotona princeps) in human-modified habitats near Snoqualmie Pass

Document Type

Poster

Campus where you would like to present

Ellensburg

Event Website

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source

Start Date

18-5-2020

Abstract

Though the range of the American pika (Ochotona princeps) extends throughout western North America, individual subpopulations are found in rocky patches that are separated by habitat barriers. These subpopulations face many obstacles to dispersion that can be exacerbated by human-made stressors and barriers. One such barrier is Interstate 90, which is currently under study near Snoqualmie Pass. Data from this study will be used in this project to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of pika occupancy. The available data contains information on patch occupancy from 2008-2019 as well as the geographic location and patch type as defined by the characteristics of the area (natural vs. anthropogenic). Using GIS analysis and publicly available digital elevation maps (DEMs), slope, elevation, and aspect of each patch will be determined. Spatial statistical analysis will be used to determine whether there is any correlation between pika occupancy and distance between patches, and a time series will be produced to analysis occupancy over time. The results of these analyses will help expand the knowledge of the movement of pika metapopulations and how the presence of anthropogenic vs. natural rocky patches can affect this movement. Pikas are extremely sensitive to high temperatures and as human activity continues to exacerbate both climate change and habitat fragmentation, the ability to understand the pika’s movements will be valuable to its conservation efforts.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kristina Ernest

Department/Program

Biological Sciences

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May 18th, 12:00 PM

Spatial and Temporal Relationships of the American pika (Ochotona princeps) in human-modified habitats near Snoqualmie Pass

Ellensburg

Though the range of the American pika (Ochotona princeps) extends throughout western North America, individual subpopulations are found in rocky patches that are separated by habitat barriers. These subpopulations face many obstacles to dispersion that can be exacerbated by human-made stressors and barriers. One such barrier is Interstate 90, which is currently under study near Snoqualmie Pass. Data from this study will be used in this project to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of pika occupancy. The available data contains information on patch occupancy from 2008-2019 as well as the geographic location and patch type as defined by the characteristics of the area (natural vs. anthropogenic). Using GIS analysis and publicly available digital elevation maps (DEMs), slope, elevation, and aspect of each patch will be determined. Spatial statistical analysis will be used to determine whether there is any correlation between pika occupancy and distance between patches, and a time series will be produced to analysis occupancy over time. The results of these analyses will help expand the knowledge of the movement of pika metapopulations and how the presence of anthropogenic vs. natural rocky patches can affect this movement. Pikas are extremely sensitive to high temperatures and as human activity continues to exacerbate both climate change and habitat fragmentation, the ability to understand the pika’s movements will be valuable to its conservation efforts.

https://digitalcommons.cwu.edu/source/2020/COTS/24