Title

Inoculation of Mice against Leishmania major by Immunization with Purified Paraflagellar Rod Proteins

Presenter Information

Heidi Anderson
Ashleigh Reis

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Location

SURC Ballroom A

Start Date

17-5-2012

End Date

17-5-2012

Abstract

Leishmania major is a single-celled, vector-borne parasite responsible for the disease cutaneous leishmaniasis. This infection leads to disfiguring skin ulcers at the bite-site, which self-heal in immune competent individuals. Leishmaniasis has become an emerging zoonotic disease not only in the United States but worldwide. This can be attributed to increased global travel for military and recreational purposes and the disruption of vector habitats through industrialization in endemic areas. The World Health Organization estimates that Leishmania infects some 12 million people in 88 countries with an estimated 2 million new cases every year. Studies in a related parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, have established that the paraflagellar rod (PFR) proteins of the flagellum are highly immunogenic and can protect mice from succumbing to infection. The PFR is a unique protein lattice that runs along the flagellum found only in the order kinetoplastids, to which both Leishmania and Trypanosoma belong. The aim of our research is to investigate the immune potential of the PFR proteins derived from L. major. This study used a refined protocol of protein purification of the PFR to test the protective immune response generated in mice. In this trial, PFR and Freund's adjuvant were combined to immunize highly susceptible BALB/c mice, compared to a control mice immunized with Freund’s adjuvant alone. The lesion size in the immunized and control mice was followed over a 5 month period. Data from this study will be used to design further trials to refine and improve the immunization protocol.

Poster Number

15

Faculty Mentor(s)

Gabrielle Stryker, Blaise Dondji

Additional Mentoring Department

Biological Sciences

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May 17th, 8:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

Inoculation of Mice against Leishmania major by Immunization with Purified Paraflagellar Rod Proteins

SURC Ballroom A

Leishmania major is a single-celled, vector-borne parasite responsible for the disease cutaneous leishmaniasis. This infection leads to disfiguring skin ulcers at the bite-site, which self-heal in immune competent individuals. Leishmaniasis has become an emerging zoonotic disease not only in the United States but worldwide. This can be attributed to increased global travel for military and recreational purposes and the disruption of vector habitats through industrialization in endemic areas. The World Health Organization estimates that Leishmania infects some 12 million people in 88 countries with an estimated 2 million new cases every year. Studies in a related parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, have established that the paraflagellar rod (PFR) proteins of the flagellum are highly immunogenic and can protect mice from succumbing to infection. The PFR is a unique protein lattice that runs along the flagellum found only in the order kinetoplastids, to which both Leishmania and Trypanosoma belong. The aim of our research is to investigate the immune potential of the PFR proteins derived from L. major. This study used a refined protocol of protein purification of the PFR to test the protective immune response generated in mice. In this trial, PFR and Freund's adjuvant were combined to immunize highly susceptible BALB/c mice, compared to a control mice immunized with Freund’s adjuvant alone. The lesion size in the immunized and control mice was followed over a 5 month period. Data from this study will be used to design further trials to refine and improve the immunization protocol.