Document Type

Article

Department or Administrative Unit

Center for Teaching and Learning

Publication Date

1938

Abstract

The theory of General Semantics in its present (1935) form is essentially that there exists in the human nervous system a general mechanism, somewhat similar in nature of concept to that type of functioning which we have been calling vaguely, intelligence. In distinction, however, to the commonly held views on intelligence, General Semantics implies that this mechanism is exceedingly amenable to environmental influences; that it may, in other words, show marked effects of training in Semantic methods.

To this end a group of thirty sophomores in the Washington State Normal School at Ellensburg, Washington, were given the Detroit Intelligence Test, Advanced form; then submitted to six weeks of training in Semantic methods, and then retested.

Comments

This conference presentation was originally published in General semantics: papers from the first American Congress for General Semantics.

Journal

General semantics: papers from the first American Congress for General Semantics

Available for download on Tuesday, January 01, 2030

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